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This page revised and Copyrighted: Theon Doxazo

14 December, 2023

 

Vs. 13-15 - To Stir You Up

02.3.7

“And I consider it right, as long as I am in this earthly dwelling, to stir you up by way of reminder,

knowing that the laying aside of my earthly dwelling is imminent, as also our Lord Jesus Christ has made clear to me.

And I will also be diligent that at any time after my departure you may be able to call these things to mind.”  -  2 Peter 1:13-15

 

In verse 13, Peter seems to be telling us that he sees the promulgation of 'these things' to be part of his life's work.  He seems to intend to keep doing this 'as long as I am in this earthly dwelling', or for as long as he has left to live.  In verse 14 we are told that the end of his life is upon him.  Even so, he intends to continue to 'stir us up'.

 

Even as Peter has exhorted us to be diligent in verses 5 and 10, so here he commits himself to be diligent as well.  What is the task that he intends to continue to diligently undertake, even as his life is threatened?  He intends to remind us of 'these things'.  Remember that the Greek changes at verse 12 and some believe the 'these things' referred to here are everything from 1-11.  Others believe, as I do, that the things in verses 5-7 are what are referred to.

 

If the Apostle Peter saw his life coming to a close and wished to make as big a contribution as possible before he died, he seems to have done so by stressing the importance of Christ's disciples striving to mature themselves spiritually following the sequence of growth outlined in verses 5-7.

 

In the ancient world, they did not have word processors.  I know that's a shock, but it's true.  They did not have a range of fonts to choose from.  They didn't underline, bold face, or italicize their texts.  They couldn't write the words in red ink, etc.  In fact, in the early Greek language, there was no punctuation and nospacesbetweenwords!  For an illustration of this consider this image.  This picture displays a page from the Codex Vaticanus displaying the text for 2 Thess. 3:11-18 and Heb. 1:1 thru 2:2.  This was the general style of producing books in that age.

 

The methods we take for granted to highlight important passages were not available to authors of that day.  Instead they were forced to emphasize parts of the text by the use of the words surrounding and describing the text to be stressed.  Thus, we find that our text in 2 Peter 1 has multiple verses that systematically stress the importance of the character qualities found in verses 5-7.

 

The Apostle Peter stresses the importance of growing spiritually in the prescribed manner by pointing out that, if we do so, we will be useful, fruitful (vs 8), not blind (vs 9), never stumble (vs 10), and be given an abundant entrance into heaven (vs 11).  He will always remind us of these things (vs 12), even in the face of his imminent death (vs 13-15).  Considering the multitude of promises and the intensity of the implied punishments for failure, I can think of few other passages of scripture that are as highly emphasized as this one.  Given this, we should pay attention to verses 5-7!